UTC 19:09

EASA concludes that the Boeing 737 MAX is safe

Through an Airworthiness Directive (AD), the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) finally released, on Wednesday, January 27, 2021, the Boeing 737 MAX to fly in Europe.

EASA, which serves as aviation safety and certification authority, lifted restrictions on the Boeing 737 MAX aircraft through AD 2021-0039. The document defines the steps that operators must follow before the jet aeroplane can re-enter the market:

- The installation of new software on the aircraft's computers, including the Flight Control Computer (FCC), physically separating the electrical wires from the cabin to the horizontal stabilizer;

- The update of the Aircraft Flight Manual (AFM);

- Pilots must take a new and updated training course, which includes flight in the simulator; and

- Airlines will have to test the new systems, including the new angle of attack (AOA) system and conduct a test flight.

- The installation of new software on the aircraft's computers, including the Flight Control Computer (FCC), physically separating the electrical wires from the cabin to the horizontal stabilizer;

- The update of the Aircraft Flight Manual (AFM);

- Pilots must take a new and updated training course, which includes flight in the simulator; and

- Airlines will have to test the new systems, including the new angle of attack (AOA) system and conduct a test flight.

The difference of requirements between EASA and the FAA is minimal. In addition to the above, EASA has asked air carriers to install colored buttons on circuit breakers to help the crew disable the stick shaker if it is activated incorrectly. In addition, high-precision landings with the aircraft cannot be made, which "should be a short-term constraint," noted the European regulator.

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